I’ve teamed up with Urban Eden Farm to host popup sales of my world famous pies & preserves!

Catch me at their farm stand on certain Saturdays this summer, 9-12 pm. 2121 S Cherry Street in Spokane.

I make all my food with super-local, super-fresh ingredients, following recipes from my cookbook Pie School and my upcoming release The Book of Difficult Fruit.

Quantities are small batch and limited. Order in advance by emailing kate.lebo@gmail.com.

Memorial Week Menu – pick up May 23

This week’s menu is all about my very favorite fruit-that’s-actually-a-vegetable, rhubarb! This rhubarb was sourced from Urban Eden, so it’s the best. My pie crusts are all-butter unless you request a vegan crust.

Pie

Classic Rhubarb pie – all rhubarb. No BS. $30 SOLD OUT
Rhubarb Ginger pie – rhubarb, fresh ginger. Modeled after my favorite English-style jam. $30
Rhubarb Custard pie – rhubarb, vanilla custard. $30 SOLD OUT

Preserves

Rhubarb Rosemary Jam (8 oz) – $8
Italian Plum Jam (8 oz) – $8
Orange Marmalade (8 oz) – $8 SOLD OUT
Medlar Jelly (8 oz) – $10
Caramel (8 oz) – $6 SOLD OUT
Pickled Rhubarb (8 oz) – $6
Kimchi (16 oz) – $9 SOLD OUT

Cheese

Fromage Blanc, plain or herbed (8 oz) – $8
Gooseberry Cheese (4 oz) – $5

Very Important Questions You Might Have

How do I buy these amazing pies, preserves, and cheeses?

Email kate.lebo@gmail.com with your order by noon, May 22. Pick-up your order from me at the Urban Eden farm stand between 9 and noon on May 23.

What are you doing to ensure customer safety during the COVID pandemic?

All pies will be frozen for you to bake yourself at home. All jams have been pasteurized and are shelf stable for at least 12 months. My cheese is a raw product (and so much tastier that way) prepared in strictly sanitary conditions, packaged for you in plastic while wearing gloves. When you come pick your food up, I’ll be wearing a mask and will maintain at least 6 feet of distance from each customer. I’ll accept cash or check only at pickup, no need to touch a register.

How do I bake my pie?

I’ll include detailed instructions to ensure complete success.

What the heck is a medlar?

A relative of quince and apples, medlars were last popular in Early Modern Europe. Though not particularly tasty when fresh, they’re absolutely divine when made into a jelly. Expect a delicate and sweet flavor, a little like honeyed rooibos tea. I love it with soft cheese and bread. I sourced these medlars in Spokane and Seattle.

Oranges aren’t local. Where did you get these?

From a relative’s tree in Phoenix. Totally organic, since she doesn’t do a thing but pick them once a year and send them to me!

Cheese can be made from gooseberries?

Yes, but not the cheese you’re thinking of. This cheese is completely fruit-based, cooked into a firm preserve you’ll cut from the jar. Exactly like membrillo, but made with gooseberries sourced from Northwest Wild Foods.

Pickled rhubarb? Really?

Yes. It’s awesome. Serve them with roast chicken, add them to a cheese plate, or dice them into relish and spoon onto oysters.

Do you ship?

No, sorry. This sale is for Spokane locals only. But you can grab a copy of Pie School and make your own pies wherever you live.

Who are you and why would I want to buy your pie/preserves/cheese?

I’m a writer, pie lady, and one-half of the duo who brings you the Pie & Whiskey reading series at Get Lit!, Spokane’s literary festival. I’m known for extremely delicious fruit pies and for Pie School, my cookbook and traveling pie-making academy. Through the Washington Center for Cultural Traditions, I’m an apprenticed cheesemaker to Lora Lea Misterly of Quillisascut Farm. My next book is a collection of nonfiction with recipes called The Book of Difficult Fruit, out next spring from FSG. I’m interested in how heritage cooking practices can be adapted to everyday kitchens. Through recording these practices in cookbooks, practicing them in my own kitchen in sustainable ways, and selling the products to you at affordable prices, I hope to help keep old-school flavors alive and take a bite out of the idea that “artisan” food must be expensive or out of reach.